Course Category
Course Location

PTP News

Archive: Nov 2020

Tired, Fatigued, Exhausted?

Posted: November 19, 2020 12:09 pm
The past year has been challenging and draining and has left many people feeling less energised and motivated than they might under ‘normal’ conditions. We often tend to use words such as tired, fatigued and exhausted interchangeably but actually each one has very different implications. Could you recognise these conditions in yourself if one was happening to you? What would you need to look out for in colleagues or those working for you if it looked like they were heading into these waters?

Tiredness

If you’re experiencing tiredness then this is usually the result of something physical. It could be poor sleep, not eating enough or overdoing the exercise. Being tired is probably the simplest of the three to recover effectively from - you can start by identifying what’s causing the tiredness and then take steps to tackle it. If you’re not sleeping then try changing your routine and going to bed earlier. Maybe you need a more varied diet, more water, or less sugar. Or it may simply be that you need to take some time out to physically rest. A lack of energy, physical aches and soreness are all symptoms where tiredness is concerned.

Fatigue

The origin of fatigue is often partly physical but predominantly a mentally and emotionally driven condition. It may not be something that a good sleep and a change in diet can correct. Fatigue often manifests itself as being unable to make decisions, feeling like your emotions are up and down, feeling drained, listless and unmotivated. Fatigue is frequently the result of being in a situation where you are under a lot of pressure over a sustained period of time and this pressure just becomes too much to bear. You can help to relieve fatigue by creating moments where the pressure is off - time when you’re doing activities that are just for you and which you know will help to restore you. It’s important that you don’t think about whatever is causing the fatigue during that time so that you get a proper break from it. Fatigue is often the result of feeling like a situation is out of your control and that you don’t have the resources to change things. So, it can be worth using tools such as coaching, therapy, upskilling and stress management techniques to help strengthen self confidence and resolve.

Exhaustion

If you don’t deal with fatigue then exhaustion is often where this will end up. Exhaustion is predominantly a feeling that you just don’t have the energy - not for the issue that you’re dealing with, the situation you’re in or even to just carry on. It can be very alarming to experience and if you - or someone you work with - is going through it then it’s important to seek help. Sometimes exhaustion requires a complete break from whatever has put you into that state in the first place. This can provide the opportunity to rethink things and perhaps start making plans for a new approach. Tiredness, fatigue and exhaustion are all signs that something needs to change - taking any action, however small, is sometimes all you need to do as a first step. Find out more by booking onto our Mindfullness: How to Handle the Pressure with Ease training course...

Working at Home 1

Posted: November 5, 2020 12:09 pm
Flexible working has increasingly become a part of life in recent years but not to the extent that we have seen in the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, remote working may not be a choice for everyone but it is, nevertheless, a lifestyle that we need to adapt to - and to be able to continue to thrive within. These tips are designed to help make working from home a positive and proactive way of life for all of those currently trying to adapt to it.

Check your habits

When you are entirely in charge of your own day you can create your own routines. This presents a real opportunity for some positive habits to develop but can also be a challenge. We are often not aware of the daily habits that we’ve fallen into in the workplace - the commuting route we take, the time we start and finish work, when we eat lunch, who we spend time with - and when this structure is removed it can make the day feel quite unwieldy. So, the first step to establishing yourself in a positive work from home structure is to think about the habits that you’ve always had, those that you want to have now and any bad habits you’ve already fallen into that you don’t really want to sustain.

Create your new daily routine

New circumstances are a prime opportunity for a new routine and creating this proactively can be powerful in terms of day-to-day experience. Some key questions to answer include:
  • When are you going to get up and what time do you need to start work?
  • When does the day officially finish? Make sure you switch off completely at this point as there is a temptation when you’re working from home just to keep going.
  • What do you want your new pre-work routine to look like - just a shower and breakfast or a run around the block and some meditation time too?
  • How can you make the most of a lunch break? If you don’t have work colleagues to socialise with could you have a call with friends or go outside and get some fresh air?
  • What routines would bring comfort? E.g. walking the dog twice a day or doing a bit of gardening.

Allow yourself some leeway

You may find that you have a lot of excess energy if you’re being more sedentary than usual and this could lead to feeling grumpy and out of sorts. Allow that this is just a normal part of processing this change in circumstances and try to find ways to deal with it, such as a short burst of cardio or even singing to the radio. If you feel unsettled and anxious then channel your energy into something positive - such as reading or creating - rather than resorting to watching Netflix or going down an Instagram hole.

Exercise, diet and sleep

These are the three factors most likely to be thrown off by a change in working circumstances - and probably the most important when it comes to getting yourself back on track.
  • You might find that you’re eating more while working from home - or comfort eating because of all the current uncertainty. Switching to healthier food and reducing snacks can help you to better manage your energy levels and also help you focus.
  • Introducing more exercise into your day can help with motivation, weight management and energy levels. Opt for something that feels do-able - such as a walk or a short jog, a gentle yoga session or a HIIT workout. Avoid an overly-ambitious new exercise regime that you give up on within a week.
  • Especially if you’re anxious, getting a good night’s sleep can be hard to do. A positive evening routine can help with sleep - give yourself at least an hour before bed where you’re not looking at a screen and try to turn your light out a few minutes earlier.
Adjusting to working at home may take time but many people grow to love it. Find out more by booking onto our Well-Being While Working Fully or Partly from Home training course...