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Category Archive: Personal Development

  1. How to perfect your CV ahead of job interviews

    A concise, well-structured and informative CV is absolutely crucial for ensuring you make it through to the interview stage of a recruitment process. Most employers make decisions about CVs in a matter of seconds and it takes just a few errors or a lack of information for yours to end up in the wrong pile. So, how do you perfect your CV ahead of job interviews to ensure that you make it through to a face-to-face?

    Be concise

    Your CV has roughly eight seconds to work its magic on the person viewing it, so a lengthy tome is going to be almost useless. In terms of your career, focus on the best bits and the headlines, ensuring that everything is relevant to the role you’re applying for – you don’t need to tell your entire career history.

    Say why you’re the best person for the job

    You may think that the skills and experience in your CV make it clear why you’re the best person for the job but a potential employer may not make the same links. A personal statement is a short, direct paragraph that sets out exactly why you are the ideal candidate, making the connection in case the employer hasn’t.

    Make sure your CV is up to date

    You’re wasting a huge opportunity if your CV doesn’t have all your most recent experience on. Employers tend to be suspicious if all the experience listed is old and out of date so take the time to keep your CV up to date. You’ll also need to explain any gaps in your career timeline – find a positive way to illustrate time spent on something that wasn’t work and why this has been valuable to your development and growth in the long run.

    Never lie

    Yes you should always use your CV to reflect the best possible version of everything you’ve achieved. However, embellishing or lying about what you’ve done and what you’re capable of just means you’re likely to get caught out at interview or when your references are checked.

    Don’t be that person…

    … who ends up in the “no” pile simply because they didn’t check the spelling. Employers will always be put off by spelling and grammar errors so it’s just not worth letting such unnecessary mistakes slip through the net.

    If your CV is online, include keywords

    If your CV contains keywords that are relevant to the sector you work in and the role that you’re looking for then you’re much more likely to get employers coming to you.

    Make your CV stand out

    There are a number of ways you can do this, including identifying any statistics, figures or other ways of quantifying what you’ve achieved to give your CV more credibility. Remember that the CV needs to look good and flow easily so pay attention to paragraphing, use bullet points and apply a little bit of graphic design so the end result is professional and easy to understand.

    Your CV is the key to the door of the interview room so don’t neglect it. With a great CV you’ll be able to increase the opportunities that are available to you and find that dream role. Take a look at our Half Day Masterclass in Brushing up your CV Writing and Interview Skills for more tips.

  2. 5 personal skills that every successful administrator needs

    Administrators are the unseen heroes of almost every business. They not only keep the wheels of the business ticking over but have the knowledge and insight to suggest innovative change within an organisation. With the right combination of experience, ability and personal skills, an administrator can become crucial to the future success of the business.

    5 key person skills administrators need to have

    Strong communication

    The ability to clearly communicate, both in writing and verbally, is essential for an administrator. You might be the first person clients or customers come into contact with, as well as the reference individual for all the teams internally. Given the range and diversity of people you’re likely to have to deal with it’s essential to be able to clearly and concisely communicate with each one, whether you’re explaining or persuading.

    Able to handle the pressure

    As an administrator you will often find yourself in challenging situations, whether you are stretching the limits of your skill set or dealing with individual demands. Being able to handle any pressured situation with composure and calm is an important skill for an administrator. You’ll need to be able to assess the situation and make decisions on your feet in order to find the right solutions.

    Embracing the new

    Being an effective administrator requires a desire to get into the latest technology and systems so that you are primed to identify the best option for the business. Knowledge of key systems, such as Microsoft Word, Outlook and Excel is a basic requirement and a breadth of understanding when it comes to everything from payroll through to PowerPoint will also be incredibly useful. The most valued administrators are often those who are always testing out new ideas and willing to learn new systems and processes so as to be of benefit to the business. For example, an administrator with a sound understanding of social media who is able to kick start this channel for an employer – and explore its potential for the business – will be a huge advantage.

    A cost effective mindset

    Every business is always keen to make cost savings. An administrator with a natural eye for opportunities to reduce costs and introduce efficiencies will be a huge asset to any organisation. The person in an administrator role is often privy to a wide range of information and insights that others in the organisation may not have. As a result they are often perfectly placed to be able to suggest cost cutting solutions that could prove to be invaluable to the business.

    Always having one ear to the ground

    Being an industry insider is a crucial skill for an administrator, both when it comes to understanding the language of the sector and the systems and technology that support and drive it. Being in touch with industry trends and able to identify those that might be beneficial to the business is also a great skill to have.

    Our Effective Administrator course is designed to help nurture all the key skills that are likely to be most useful to an administrator in developing a long and fruitful career. Get in touch today to find out more.

  3. How can you help your team to set performance goals and review these with them?

    Performance reviews are a necessary, and essential, part of any workplace. Although they do sometimes have a bad reputation, it’s these reviews that give everyone the opportunity to better understand their role, to set key goals and to monitor progress. Whether you’re new to management, or looking to improve your team management skills, a strong approach to performance reviews is essential.

    Take the process seriously

    A quick, unstructured chat over a coffee might feel more enjoyable than something more formal but it could also fail to deliver the right results. So, make sure you have a structured process in place, a set timeline for everyone to adhere to and one that makes sense in terms of when your business conducts performance reviews or hands out bonuses.

    Key steps involved in goal setting and review

    On the basis of a 12-month cycle, there are five key stages to consider when it comes to performance goals and review.

    Month 1 – setting goals

    Start the yearly cycle by sharing goals and objectives with the entire team. Meet with each employee to ensure they’ve absorbed the company’s goals and to define their own personal goals for the year. Use a clear framework for individual goal setting – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Results-oriented, Time-bound (SMART) will ensure that the objectives you set are within reach.

    Month 3 (and every quarter after that)

    Rather than attempting to summarise an entire year in a single performance review at the end of 12 months, it’s often preferable to check in throughout the year. The idea of each check in will be to sit down with the SMART goals defined at the start of the year, look at expectations and see what the employee has achieved in terms of results. Take notes from each one so that you have more to work from at the end of the year too.

    Month 10 – Employee preparation

    Now is a good time to give employees notice that they should begin preparing for the review and to agree a date for the end of year review. Ask employees to begin compiling their own results, as well as completing any forms that company requires.

    Month 10 – 11 – Manager preparation

    It’s not just employees who need to prepare for performance reviews. As a manager you’ll also need to compile notes, results and data, as well as gathering feedback. Identify the structure that you want to use for your performance reviews and then stick to this so that you’re using the same approach for every employee. It’s important to ensure that every review identifies areas for improvement but also provides encouragement.

    Month 12 – Carry out the performance reviews

    Remember that different people respond differently to reviews so it’s worth tailoring your approach to personality types while retaining that key consistent structure. It will also be important to encourage employees to feedback on the review process itself to make sure that it works.

    Our Performance Review Skills course is ideal for managers looking to get more from employees via effective reviews.

  4. How to compose yourself with emotional intelligence in the workplace?

    The way that we handle ourselves in a work environment – and how we relate to others – is more relevant now than it has ever been. While skills, experience and aptitude are still key, the qualities of emotional intelligence, such as motivation and how well we manage our own feelings, are just as likely to be assessed. The World Economic Forum ranked Emotional Intelligence (EQ) as sixth among the Top 10 skills employees need to thrive in the future workplace. But how do you nurture EQ to compose yourself at work and how might it impact on your career?

    Defining Emotional Intelligence

    EQ is the ability to recognise, manage and understand feelings and emotions. It could take a range of different forms, including being able to control impulses and moods, to recognise emotions and to feel the empathy required to understand why others do what they do. Multiple surveys have shown that EQ is increasingly something that hiring managers look for. It also has a big part to play in whether employees are promoted or not. Plus, EQ has been linked to performance – 90% of top performers also demonstrate high EQ.

    EQ in the workplace

    The impact on motivation

    A high EQ means that someone has the ability to self-regulate, to understand their own emotions, as well as those of others, such as competitors. This can have a significant impact on motivation, helping to reduce time wasting and making it easier to set clearer, more achievable goals that you actually accomplish.

    Team EQ

    Just like an individual, a team can also develop its own EQ. Nurturing EQ at a team level means building up a high degree of trust, group identity and team efficiency. It relies on establishing benchmarks of EQ at every level of interaction within the team. Those teams that demonstrate the most achievement and efficiency are often those where EQ levels are high.

    Positive Mental Attitude

    No matter what the circumstances, it seems that those with higher EQ are better able to handle life and to develop a positive mental outlook that makes them more composed at work.

    Communication and understanding others

    High EQ brings empathy and the ability to understand others in the workplace, their wants, needs and motivation. It enables you to identify another person’s point of view and to get more insight into how they behave. People with high EQ also find it much easier to communicate, which is a key foundation for being a positive, proactive and composed member of the workplace.

    Handling stress

    EQ may also have an influence when it comes to the impact of work stress. Stress can affect many areas of our lives, from sleeping to the choices we make when it comes to exercise and food. Even in a high pressured situation, strong EQ makes it simpler to choose options that will contribute towards more effective handling of stress.

    Our Working With Emotional Intelligence course is designed to help you understand and nurture EQ in the workplace so that you can integrate it into your everyday experience.

  5. How to compose yourself with emotional intelligence in the workplace?

    The way that we handle ourselves in a work environment – and how we relate to others – is more relevant now than it has ever been. While skills, experience and aptitude are still key, the qualities of emotional intelligence, such as motivation and how well we manage our own feelings, are just as likely to be assessed. The World Economic Forum ranked Emotional Intelligence (EQ) as sixth among the Top 10 skills employees need to thrive in the future workplace. But how do you nurture EQ to compose yourself at work and how might it impact on your career?

    Defining Emotional Intelligence

    EQ is the ability to recognise, manage and understand feelings and emotions. It could take a range of different forms, including being able to control impulses and moods, to recognise emotions and to feel the empathy required to understand why others do what they do. Multiple surveys have shown that EQ is increasingly something that hiring managers look for. It also has a big part to play in whether employees are promoted or not. Plus, EQ has been linked to performance – 90% of top performers also demonstrate high EQ.

    EQ in the workplace

    The impact on motivation

    A high EQ means that someone has the ability to self-regulate, to understand their own emotions, as well as those of others, such as competitors. This can have a significant impact on motivation, helping to reduce time wasting and making it easier to set clearer, more achievable goals that you actually accomplish.

    Team EQ

    Just like an individual, a team can also develop its own EQ. Nurturing EQ at a team level means building up a high degree of trust, group identity and team efficiency. It relies on establishing benchmarks of EQ at every level of interaction within the team. Those teams that demonstrate the most achievement and efficiency are often those where EQ levels are high.

    Positive Mental Attitude

    No matter what the circumstances, it seems that those with higher EQ are better able to handle life and to develop a positive mental outlook that makes them more composed at work.

    Communication and understanding others

    High EQ brings empathy and the ability to understand others in the workplace, their wants, needs and motivation. It enables you to identify another person’s point of view and to get more insight into how they behave. People with high EQ also find it much easier to communicate, which is a key foundation for being a positive, proactive and composed member of the workplace.

    Handling stress

    EQ may also have an influence when it comes to the impact of work stress. Stress can affect many areas of our lives, from sleeping to the choices we make when it comes to exercise and food. Even in a high pressured situation, strong EQ makes it simpler to choose options that will contribute towards more effective handling of stress.

    Our Working With Emotional Intelligence course is designed to help you understand and nurture EQ in the workplace so that you can integrate it into your everyday experience.

  6. What are key productivity challenges in the workplace and how can you overcome them?

    How productive are you at work? If you’ve ever finished a working day feeling like you just haven’t got enough done, or you don’t seem to have made any progress on a To Do list, then productivity could be an issue for you. Learning how to manage your time so that your resources and energy are used productively is essential for getting the most from your role. These are some of the key productivity challenges you might face, as well as some solutions for overcoming them.

    Challenge: getting everything done

    Solution: focus on one task at a time

    Multi-tasking is the reason that many of us can feel incredibly busy in the space of an hour but seem to have achieved very little at the end of it. Some scientists even believe that multi-tasking is not something the human brain is capable of. If you’re struggling to get everything done then you might find it easier to just do one thing at a time – and don’t move on to a new task until you’ve finished the last one.

    Challenge: the big goals

    Solution: break everything down into smaller tasks and objectives

    If you’re going to get to the big objectives then you need to map out the small steps that will take you there and focus on these one at a time. Otherwise you may find yourself staring at the “finish project” goal for hours and achieving nothing because you don’t know where to start. Instead, focus on what you need to do day-by-day and step-by-step to get you there.

    Challenge: working long hours

    Solution: regular breaks

    Productivity cannot be sustained over a long period of time without being refreshed. If you plan regular breaks into your working day then you’ll give your body and mind the chance to refresh and revive. There is plenty of scientific evidence to support the fact that regular breaks will, not only help you to concentrate and be more productive but also improve your mood, so schedule these in every hour or so and get away from your desk.

    Challenge: wasting time

    Solution: the two minute rule

    If your response to having a couple of free minutes is to jump on social media or browse online then you could be wasting valuable time that could make you more productive. Entrepreneur Steve Olenski says that you can save time by finding and immediately completing tasks that take two minutes or less – over the course of a working day that could build up to significantly improved productivity.

    Challenge: avoiding the most intimidating tasks

    Solution: tackle them when you’re feeling most alert

    Avoiding the jobs that are the most complicated or time consuming can end up setting a project back days, weeks or even months. If you’re continuously failing to start because you’re leaving the most intimidating tasks to the end of your daily list then your productivity will be severely impacted. Instead, prioritise those heavy or complex tasks for the times when you feel most alert and you’ll be surprised by how painless they are, and how quickly you can complete them.

    Our Working Productively course is designed to help you assess your individual productivity challenges and to identify the best ways to overcome them.

  7. How can you become an expert at objection handling in your workplace?

    Objections can bring us up short. Most often heard in the context of a sales conversation, an objection can bring a pitch to an end and remove the potential for a conversion – unless effectively dealt with. Objections can also arise in many other situations, from team members objecting to a plan to a manager who raises objections to a request for a pay rise or a promotion. Whatever the context, how can you become an expert at objection handling?

    Why is it important to handle objections?

    Objections are basically roadblocks. Whether your goal is to achieve a sale with a customer, or to convince someone to try another process or idea to get to an objective, when there’s an objection in the way then nothing can go any further. The longer a person holds an objection, the more entrenched it can become and the more difficult it will be to shift. So, it’s important to deal with objections as soon as they arise – and to be alert to the fact that they could arise at any moment. Dealt with in the right way, objections don’t have to become obstacles. Sometimes, they may even open a channel to getting to your ideal destination more quickly.

    How can you become an expert at handling objections?

    Welcome objections rather than avoiding them

    This means not just being prepared for someone to raise an objection but also proactively encouraging them to voice that objection early on. So, you might ask if someone has any concerns to something you’ve suggested, or to the product you’re trying to sell, rather than waiting for them to bring it up. The sooner you deal with the objection after it forms in the mind of the person you’re speaking to, the easier it will be to get past it.

    Listen, Acknowledge, Explore, Respond

    Hearing objections raised may make you feel like instantly trying to shut them down but sometimes this can just make a situation worse. Instead, start by listening to the objection so that you understand exactly what the problem is. Acknowledge that the objection has been raised and then explore some of the reasons for it. When you’re ready, respond thoughtfully. You’ll have more chance of being listened to if you’ve already listened to what was said and a better opportunity to get through to someone if you present your response in a thoughtful way.

    Keep track of common objections

    This is a useful tactic if you’re in an environment, such as sales, where you’re hearing many of the same objections repeatedly. If you start tracking them you’ll be able to identify the most common objections and be prepared for them next time around. It may be useful to role play responses to objections so that you can refine them in a way that will make your replies more effective.

    Whatever the context, the ability to handle objections is essential. Our Objection Handling Skills course helps you to find the best possible answer in every situation so that you’re not held back by the objections you face.

  8. How to get yourself interview-ready

    If you’re looking for a job – or facing the necessity of finding a new role – the interview stage of the recruitment process can be the most essential. Your CV and references have brought you this far but the pressure is on to ensure that you make a good impression and stand out from the crowd on the day. Preparation is essential for interviews. With preparation and practice you can get yourself ready for any face-to-face challenge.

    Find out where you’re going

    Start with the simplest piece of preparation – the logistics. Make sure you know where you’re going before the morning of the interview arrives and work out the fastest and easiest transport route for getting there. Time the route so that you know exactly how long you’ll need for travel and try to arrive 15 minutes early so you have time to gather your thoughts. The easiest way to make a bad first impression at interview is to be late and this can set the tone for the entire conversation so it’s crucial to avoid it.

    Make all your practical decisions now

    What to wear to an interview can be difficult if you leave it until the last minute. Find out what the dress code for the business is and try to match your clothes to that – if you can’t get any information on this then business casual is a good fallback. Consider everything, from what shoes to wear to how to style your hair and what bag to carry. Lay everything out the night before – along with any documents you need to take – so that you don’t have to make these decisions on the day.

    Do your research

    It’s crucial to ensure you stand out as someone who has taken the time to prepare properly for the interview.

    • Make sure you understand the job. What are the skills and experience they’re looking for, do they mention personal qualities, and what exactly does the day-to-day of the role entail?
    • Match your profile to the job requirements. Once you have a list of everything the job requires, start matching this up to your own skills, experience and attributes so that you can talk about this effortlessly in the interview.
    • Research the business. Read the website, company profiles, blogs and LinkedIn posts to see what information the company has made available about its operations, values and goals. Look for mentions on social media and in the press so that you’re as well informed as possible before you walk through the door.

    Practice for the interview

    Get a friend or colleague to run you through a practice interview so that you’re used to answering questions about your CV, skills and experience. Think about how you’re going to greet the interviewer and what kind of body language would convey a positive impression during the interview itself. Ask your practice interviewer to give you some feedback on factors such as confidence, clarity of answers and how you come across. When you’re practicing your interview technique remember:

    • Calm and open body language and maintaining eye contact will make you seem interested and engaged
    • A good interviewee listens, as well as talks
    • You’ll need to prepare some intelligent questions that incorporate the in-depth research you’ve done
    • Being open and enthusiastic about being interested in the job is often a plus – this is not the place to play hard to get

    Our CV Writing and Interview Confidence Building course is an excellent way to prepare for the challenge of taking the next step in your career.

  9. How to create a strong mentoring scheme in your workplace

    Every organisation faces the challenge of staff development and providing a range of opportunities for employees to learn and grow. A mentoring scheme is a very simple but effective tool that makes use of the attitudes and experience of more senior members of staff to help shape the development of others. Creating a strong mentoring scheme in your workplace has many benefits – using informal structures to pass on skills, knowledge and support is often more effective and brings people together.

    Tips for creating a strong mentoring scheme

    Structure mentoring around mentee need

    A strong mentoring programme is not about creating a scheme based on the skills of the mentor and then finding a mentee to fit. In order to be successful the starting point is always the mentee. What is it that the mentee needs to acquire in order to progress? This could be anything, from technical skill and knowledge, to social or political insights. When you focus on establishing a scheme that is designed with what less experienced members of staff need to progress in mind then you are laying the foundations for real success.

    Be cautious when choosing the mentors

    Not everyone is suited to being a mentor, no matter how much skill or experience they have. Initially, it’s important to identify those who actually want to be involved in a mentoring scheme, as the willingness to apply time and effort to helping someone else progress will be fundamental to whether results are achieved. It’s also important to look for mentors who have the right skill set and experience – people who are going to pass on useful insights and help others achieve more in the right way. Mentors should also be those who understand the business’ culture and concerns and apply this to their own roles every day. Otherwise you may have a mentor who is passing on fantastic advice, none of which is being given in the context of business.

    Create mentor schemes with business goals

    Mentoring has a very positive impact on staff and can help to improve performance and relationships between individuals in the organisation who may otherwise have had little or no contact. However, it’s important not to forget that mentoring always has one crucial goal for employers: identifying stand out talent within the business. This is a great opportunity to find your star performers of the future to support internal promotion and avoid costly external recruitment.

    Focus on mutually beneficial relationships

    Very hierarchical mentoring structures often run into issues. Although a mentor may be a senior member of staff, they should not be senior by virtue of being a mentor. Mentoring schemes work better without workplace hierarchies and a focus on winning or losing, success or failure or scoring points. Mentoring schemes should sit slightly outside of the business structure and give something to both parties taking part.

    Coaching and mentoring has an important role to play in modern business. Our Coaching and Mentoring training course gives coaches and mentors the opportunity to develop the high levels of skill required to be able to work both quickly and well with mentees.

  10. 8 ways to improve your time management at work?

    Positive time management is essential to career progress. Time is a limited resource and one that we cannot get back if it is wasted. We all work within the same time limits – only 24 hours in a day – so what can you do to improve your time management at work and make sure you’re getting the most from the hours that you have?

    1. Learn to self-care

    There is nothing more important than learning how to look after your body and mind so that you can perform at your best. No amount of goal setting or efficiency training will work if you’re sleep deprived and living off a diet of refined sugar. Regular exercise, nutrient-rich food and positive sleep patterns provide an essential foundation for positive time management.

    2. Set your goals

    If you want to make the most of every minute then you need to have objectives that you’re working towards. Without defined goals, both short and long-term, we can waste a lot of time going around in circles. Define your goals and then identify the activities in each day that will drive you towards them.

    3. You don’t always need to say “yes.”

    Being available to others in your team or office is going to be an essential part of your progress. But you also need to learn when to say no to tasks or requests that are either not essential to what you’re trying to do, or are just someone else passing on work they should be doing themselves. If you want to climb up the ladder to management level then the ability to say no is going to be even more important.

    4. Master the art of delegation

    Delegation is not about handing off the work that you don’t want to do to someone else. It’s ensuring that you have enough support so that a project or job is successfully concluded without you being overburdened in an unconstructive way. If you’re a manager or a boss then delegation will be a crucial part of effective team management – if you’re micro managing everything then little will get done and others will feel redundant.

    5. Measure your minutes

    How much of your time is spent productively each week and how much is wasted? It can be useful to audit the way you currently managing your time to see where improvements could be made.

    6. Are you prioritising?

    Effective time management depends on ensuring that you’re completing the most important tasks first. Structure your tasks based on urgency and importance, starting with important and urgent, followed by important and non-urgent and ending with less important and not urgent tasks.

    7. Make the most of planning

    A well-structured working day makes it much easier to use your time more effectively. Take 10 minutes at the end of each day to write your goals for the following morning and clear up any chaos on your desk. The next morning, spend 15 minutes creating a clear plan for the best way to use the time you have to achieve your goals.

    8. Minimise your distractions

    If you want to get the most out of your time then reduce the number of potential distractions around you. Put your smart phone aside, close your office door and redirect your phone. You’ll find you work much smarter and harder if you’re not constantly getting interrupted.

    Our Time Management course provides a practical approach to developing time management skills and organising your time to achieve desired results.

In-House Training with PTP

PTP stands for Practical Training for Professionals and our aim is to make our training as practical as possible so delegates can return to the workplace with skills they can implement immediately. PTP now delivers training to over 40% of the FTSE 100.

What you get for your money

What is 1-to-1 training?

1-to-1 training can be based on any of the 100 plus courses that PTP provides, it includes an initial telephone conference of up to 1 hour, a 1/2 day (3.5 hours) on-site one to one training session at your premises with one of PTP's expert trainers and then a further telephone conference call of up to an hour within 2 weeks of the on-site visit.

You have the option of a line manager being involved in both telephone conferences, the second telephone conference which can be for feedback and action planning is generally scheduled during the on-site visit.

Who does 1-to-1 training suit?

Individuals taking on a new challenge or responsibilities. Professionals who want a trusted "sounding board" and thinking partner. Executives or managers who want to enhance their leadership effectiveness to achieve organizational and career success. Executives and professionals wanting to compete successfully but still retain balance in their life. Individuals who want to understand their blind spots so that they don't stand in their own way on their path to success. Executives and Professionals who want to improve their interpersonal skills so as to be more effective with bosses, peers, subordinates, or people in general. How much does 1-to-1 training cost?

A 1-to-1 training session costs from as little as £400 + VAT and will include an initial telephone conference of up to 1 hour, a 1/2 day (3.5 hours) on-site training at your premises and then a further telephone conference call of up to an hour within 2 weeks of the on-site visit.

What is U-Choose?

Choose from any of the 150 plus courses that PTP provides, and choose from 1 of our 50 plus UK wide training venues. You must book for 2 or more delegates and at least 4 weeks in advance, but that’s it, the course you want where you want it. The reason we ask for a minimum of 4 weeks notice is to enable us to market the course you have scheduled to other companies and organisations. However, if we fail to sell any additional places we guarantee to run the course just for you.

How much does U-Choose Training cost?

U-choose costs the same as our normal open courses i.e. the normal delegate rate. This includes lunch and refreshments throughout the day, framed certification and comprehensive training notes. A U-Choose booking can only be confirmed once we receive payment which can be made via credit/debit card, BACS or cheque. Payment is due at least 4 weeks before the date you request. Please note to be eligible for U-Choose you must book a minimum of 2 delegates on the same course & date.